Cornell University

2010 Milton Konvitz Memorial Lecture

November 8, Ithaca Campus

The Long Exception: An Interpretation of the New Deal from FDR to Obama

Nick Salvatore
Maurice and Hinda Neufeld Founders Professor of Industrial and Labor Relations and Professor of American History

Jefferson Cowie
Associate Professor of History

Date: November 8th
Time: 4:30pm, reception immediately following lecture
Location: 105 Ives hall
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Salvatore and Cowie argue that the New Deal was more of an historical aberration—a byproduct of the massive crisis of the Great Depression—than the linear triumph of the welfare state.

The depth of the Depression undoubtedly forced the realignment of American politics and class relations for the postwar decades. The political culture of that "New Deal order," however, stands distinct

from the decades before or after it, making it more the exception than the benchmark for future politics.

Nick SalvatoreNick Salvatore is the Maurice and Hinda Neufeld Founders Professor of Industrial and Labor Relations and Professor of American History at Cornell University. He is the author of Eugene V. Debs: Citizen and Socialist (1982); We All Got History: The Memory Books of Amos Webber (1996); and Singing In A Strange Land: C. L. Franklin, The Black Church, and the Transformation of America (2005), as well as three edited volumes and numerous articles and review essays.

 

 

Jefferson CowieJefferson Cowie is Associate Professor of History at the ILR School at Cornell University. He is the author of Stayin’ Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class; Capital Moves: RCA’s Seventy Year Quest for Cheap Labor, and co-editor of Beyond the Ruins: The Meanings of Deindustrialization. In addition to his scholarly publications, his reviews and essays have appeared in a variety of popular publications.

 

 

 

The Milton Konvitz Lecture is possible through the generosity of Irwin Jacobs '54 (BEE '56) and Joan Jacobs (BS HE '54).